Feed on
Posts
Comments

The Rice Show at the
Main Street Marketplace
356 Main St.
Middletown, CT

 

http://flickr.com/photos/28039610@N06/sets/72157614388615371/

Press Coverage

Eyewitness News 3

Video: http://www.wfsb.com/video/18763589/index.html

Article: http://www.wfsb.com/news/18762186/detail.html

Hartford Courant

Article: http://www.courant.com/entertainment/events/hc-artweek0219.artfeb19,0,4137094.story

Hartford Advocate

Article: http://www.hartfordadvocate.com/article.cfm?aid=11884

The Middletown Eye

Blog Post: http://middletowneyenews.blogspot.com/2009/02/rice-funny-moving-beautiful-and.html

Blog Post: http://middletowneyenews.blogspot.com/2009/02/metaphorical-rice.html

Opening Night!

We want to know what you think about this exhibit!  Please tell us about your experience in the comments section of this blog.  Visitors are also encouraged to take photos and video at the show.  Stan’s Cafe invites you to post photos of the exhibit on Flickr and tag them thericeshow so they can be captured by the aggregating site http://www.thericeshow.com

You may also submit them via the comments section to be included in this blog.

A most profound and creative event is taking place on the Wesleyan campus during the next 12 days. Ideally, one will take it in more than once, for the exhibit will continue to evolve.

Of All The People In All The World is a living, changing work of art and theatre, revealing human statistics of interest and concern. The creators hope to make normally impossible-to-imagine statistics TANGIBLE.

The idea was created in the UK by a couple of British actors who go by the name of Stan’s Café, and it is currently touring the planet. The show’s last stop was Barcelona.

This is surely the closest this world traveling exhibit will come to any of us in Connecticut. And it’s well worth the short drive to Wesleyan.

The show is held at the Zilkha Art Gallery at Wesleyan University’s Center for the Arts as part of their year long dedication to issues of global climate change and other relevant subjects.

The show is a fascinating brief walk through various displays of facts, using grains of rice as the unit of measurement to depict human statistics while suggesting connections that exist between and among them.

You, the visitor, can even bring your own set of statistics (if reliably sound and true) to the show and, possibly, they will be added to the display while you’re there. The gentlemen (all from the UK) particularly
welcome statistics relating to our lives here in our own locale, Connecticut. If they can be authenticated, they can be added to the show.

This is an intelligent, creative living exhibit–which will enlighten and provoke. You and your students, colleagues, family, and friends should be among All The People In All The World who visit this important show.

Your visit can be as short or as long as you’d like. You can spend as few as ten to fifteen minutes among the displayed groupings of rice piles and titles or as much time as you’d like at the Gallery show–to take in the significance of it all.

And it is free to the public.

Anne Cassady

http://twitter.com/thericeshow

Read climate change statistics produced by students in Barry Chernoff’s BIOL/E&ES 197 Fall 08 classes.

Log in